Operation
Barbarossa
  Operation
Citadel
  Operation
Dragoon
  Operation
Varsity
   
 
   
Operation Barbarossa

Background

Deception & Surprise

German Forces
   Army Group North
   Army Group Center
   Army Group South

Soviet Forces

German/Soviet Comparison

Famous Quotes

Battles
   Frontier Battles
   Battle of Smolensk
   Battle of Kiev
   Siege of Leningrad
   Operation Typhoon
   Soviet Counteroffensive

Weather

Lend Lease

Why Did Barbarossa Fail?



Barbarossa Facts

Barbarossa Maps



In the Media
   Books
      Barbarossa
      Moscow 1941
      The Road to Stalingrad
   DVDs
   Videos


Our Other Military Sites

World War II
Operation Barbarossa
1941 German Invasion of Russia
Operation Citadel
1943 The Battle of Kursk
Operation Dragoon
1944 Invasion of southern France
Operation Varsity
1945 Crossing the Rhine

Invasions That Never Were
Operation Sealion
1940 German invasion of England
Operation Olympic
1945 US invasion of southern Japan
Operation Coronet
1946 US invasion of northern Japan

Special Forces
Operation Entebbe
1976 Entebbe Airport Rescue
Operation Nimrod
1980 Iranian Embassy Siege

British Cold War Operations
Operation Musketeer
1956 Suez Crisis
Operation Corporate
1982 Falklands War
Operation Black Buck
1982 Vulcan raids on Port Stanley
Operation Granby
1990-91 Persian Gulf

British Post Cold War
Operation Herrick
2002- Afghanistan

 
   
Operation Barbarossa   >   Lend Lease

   
 

Lend Lease in Operation Barbarossa


A US Bell P-63 King Cobra prior to its flight to the Russian front as a Lend-Lease aircraft:

Bell P-63 Lend Lease Aircraft
When the Germany first attacked the Soviet Union on June 22nd. 1941, neither the British nor American military-leadership rated Russia's chance of survival very highly. Both expected Russia to be defeated in a few weeks.

British leader, Winston Churchill however, despite his previous anti-communism, was glad of a continental ally, famously saying "If Hitler invaded hell I would make at least a favourable reference to the devil in the House of Commons", and soon resolved to send aid to help his new ally. The first British aid convoy set off within weeks, and contained Hawker Hurricane aircraft as well as pilots and mechanics.

Meanwhile the United States, although it had not yet entered the war, had been supplying military and economic aid to Britain and other neutral and allied countries aid under the lend-lease program legislation since March 1941. The legislation had however been carefully drafted, so as to allow the possibility of supplying aid to the Soviet Union, and after after an initial period paid for gold, lend-lease aid to the Soviet Union began on October 1st 1941.

Aid was supplied to the USSR via three principle routes:
  1. Arctic convoys from Britain travelled around Norway to the Russian ports of Murmansk, Archangel. While this was the quickest route, it was also the most perilous, as the convoys came under regular attack from German U-boats, aircraft, and surface ships.

  2. The Pacific route:

    Convoys to the Russian port of Vladivostok delivered huge amounts of aid (about 50% of the total tonnage of US aid travelled this way). However, this route was affected by the outbreak of hostilities between Japan and the Western Allies in December 1941, and after that date only non-military supplies could be shipped this way, and only on Soviet ships.

    From 1942 onwards, as well as the shipborne aid, aircraft were flown via the "Northwest Staging Route" (also known as "ALSIB", the "ALaska-SIBerian air road") directly from Alaska to Siberia. The main types of aircraft supplied using this method were Bell P-39 Airacobra and Bell P-63 Kingcobra fighters, Douglas A-20 Havoc light attack bombers, North American B-25 Mitchell medium bombers, and Douglas C-47 Skytrain transports.

  3. From 1942 a supply corridor across Iran was opened up. This was the slowest route, but also the most secure.
In total, US aid to the Soviet Union during the war included over 16 million tons of goods and over $11 billion in materials: including more than 400,000 jeeps and trucks, 12,000 armored vehicles (including 7,000 tanks), 11,400 aircraft, and 1.75 million tons of food. By the end of the war, this contribution was highly significant, as by 1945 more than two thirds of the truck strength of the Red Army (and the consequent mobility this offered) was due to US-supplied trucks. In addition, US contributions in non-military fields (for example, including more than 2,000 railway locomotives and 11,000 railcars) allowed the USSR to concentrate its own production towards military ends.

British supplies to the USSR during the war amounted to more than 4 million tons. They included more than 7,000 aircraft (including 3,000 Hurricanes), 5,000 tanks, 5000 anti-tank guns, and more than 15 million boots.

It should however be noted that while these supplies were massive, most of them arrived after 1941, and initially this material support was mainly symbolic. The effects of the West Allied supplies only began to be felt at the end of 1941, and they only become truly important in the later years of the war.

A British Valentine tank emerges from the factory ready to be sent to the Russian front:
Valentine Tank


Your Comments

Please share your comments on this page:

   



 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
Note: This site is not affiliated with nor endorsed by any military or government organization.

Copyright © 2007-2017, Answers 2000 Limited

CERTAIN CONTENT THAT APPEARS ON THIS SITE COMES FROM AMAZON SERVICES LLC. THIS CONTENT IS PROVIDED 'AS IS' AND IS SUBJECT TO CHANGE OR REMOVAL AT ANY TIME.
CERTAIN CONTENT THAT APPEARS ON THIS SITE,COMES FROM AMAZON EU S. r.l. THIS CONTENT IS PROVIDED 'AS IS' AND IS SUBJECT TO CHANGE OR REMOVAL AT ANY TIME.

Disclosure: Our company's websites' content (including this website's content) includes advertisements for our own company's websites, products, and services, and for other organization's websites, products, and services. In the case of links to other organization's websites, our company may receive a payment, (1) if you purchase products or services, or (2) if you sign-up for third party offers, after following links from this website. Unless specifically otherwise stated, information about other organization's products and services, is based on information provided by that organization, the product/service vendor, and/or publicly available information - and should not be taken to mean that we have used the product/service in question. Additionally, our company's websites contain some adverts which we are paid to display, but whose content is not selected by us, such as Google AdSense ads. For more detailed information, please see Advertising/Endorsements Disclosures

Our sites use cookies, some of which may already be set on your computer. Use of our site constitutes consent for this. For details, please see Privacy.

Contact Us   Privacy   Terms of Use   Advertising/Endorsements Disclosures

In Association With Amazon.com
Answers 2000 Limited is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.
In Association With Amazon.co.uk
Answers 2000 Limited is a participant in the Amazon EU Associates Programme, an affiliate advertising programme designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.co.uk.
All trademarks are property of their respective owners.
All third party content and adverts are copyright of their respective owners.